More about Yoesden

Read about Yoesden in our blog

Listen to Wendy explore Yoesden bank in our smartphone safari.

This thriving and
diverse fragment of land is a really significant habitat for wildlife. I was delighted to learn that it was up for sale again and really hope that – with our members’ help
– we can save this precious site.

Giles Strother, BBOWT Reserves Manager

Yoesden Pinterest Board

Yoesden on Twitter

We've made it! Thank you for helping to save Yoesden Bank

We’ve made it! Thank you everyone who gave so generously to the Yoesden Bank appeal. Yoesden will now be saved forever as an exquisite haven for flowers and butterflies.

We’ve raised more than £110,000 through generous gifts from our members and many people who love the Chilterns and want to see this beautiful site protected forever.

And to get us to the £150,000 needed to buy the site we have just received a grant from a charitable trust and a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund. This will also enable us to carry out conservation management at Yoesden, and provide more opportunities for people to discover wildlife and the heritage of Chilterns woods.

Yoesden has evolved over centuries, untouched by agricultural development.  Thank you to everyone who helped BBOWT reach the appeal target of £150,000 in just four weeks to save this unique site. We’re really grateful!

A unique wildlife habitat

In medieval times, drovers herded their sheep across England’s chalk downlands. Sheep grazing, combined with nutrient-poor chalky soil, inhibited hardy and fast-growing rank grasses. This allowed a wide variety of less common plants to flourish - and created Yoesden’s unusually rich and diverse habitat. This pristine fragment of land is still undamaged by ploughing, fertilisers or intensive grazing to this day.

Yoesden Wood contains impressive beech, whitebeam and yew trees, as well as oak, wych elm and ash. The ground flora is extremely diverse and features 16 ancient woodland indicators, including wood anemones, primrose, ramsons, and dog-violets. Other scarce woodland plants, such as white helleborine and bird’s-nest orchid, are also found here.

 

 

 


Video courtesy of Rob Evans, BBOWT member

Yoesden Bank is truly special.

As you walk through the churchyard of medieval St Mary's, Radnage, Yoesden Bank rises steeply towards the classic 'beech hanger' woodland.

 

 

 

Chalk Grassland Species

Yoesden Bank thrums with wildlife. It is not only stunning, it is an extremely significant wildlife habitat. It hosts substantial colonies of rare Adonis blue and chalkhill blue butterflies, as well as the small blue. It is particularly unusual to find all three butterfly species in the same location. This a real testament to the diversity of the habitat,
where essential larval food plants such as horseshoe and kidney vetch are found in abundance.
The species found on Yoesden bank include:

Looking after Yoesden


Video courtesy of Rob Evans, BBOWT member

Historic Woodland

Yoesden Wood, a classic 'beech hanger' on the hillside forms a perfect backdrop to the valley surrounding Radnage village.

During the 19th century, the wood was looked after by local bodgers, craftsmen with pole lathes set up in the woods to make chair legs and spindles from ash and beech trees.

The current owners have managed Yoesden Wood carefully with advice from Chiltern Woodlands Project and grants for regeneration and new planting. 

We'd love to see your pictures of Yoesden. Just add them to the BBOWT Flickr group, using the tag 'Yoesden', and they will appear here.

You can also check out our Facebook page and Pinterest board. 

 

We'd love to hear your memories of Yoesden Bank. Have you been inspired by Yoesden to paint, write poetry, or carve? Please share your comments below.

Comments

    Ched George, conservation work party leader at Yoesden for several years and Butterfly Conservation’s species champion for Duke of Burgundy and dark green fritillary supports BBOWT's Yoesden Bank Appeal “As a naturalist I’ve had a deep interest in Yoesden Bank since I moved to Radnage in 1991. I volunteered to help with the scrub-bashing and brought in a few like-minded friends from west London to join in. Yoesden Bank is floristically very rich and unspoilt. It is the northernmost site for the Adonis blue butterfly, silver-washed fritillaries have made regular appearances in recent years, and a few dark green fritillaries visit occasionally from sites nearby.”

    Monday 29th September 2014
    by

Post a comment

Ched George, conservation work party leader at Yoesden for several years and Butterfly Conservation’s species champion for Duke of Burgundy and dark green fritillary supports BBOWT's Yoesden Bank Appeal “As a naturalist I’ve had a deep interest in Yoesden Bank since I moved to Radnage in 1991. I volunteered to help with the scrub-bashing and brought in a few like-minded friends from west London to join in. Yoesden Bank is floristically very rich and unspoilt. It is the northernmost site for the Adonis blue butterfly, silver-washed fritillaries have made regular appearances in recent years, and a few dark green fritillaries visit occasionally from sites nearby.”

Monday 29th September 2014
by