Wild info: wildflower meadows

Please join your local wildlife trust today

Please join your local wildlife trust today

Please join your local wildlife trust today

Few things are more stunning than a wildflower meadow in full bloom.

Meadows are among the most diverse habitats in the British Isles and are important for many species of insect, bird and mammal. Sadly, the swathes of stunning wild flowers, an iconic part of our local landscape, are becoming far less familiar. A shocking 97% of our colourful and varied wildflower meadows in the UK have been destroyed in the last 75 years. Intensive farming methods coupled with development have contributed to the loss.

What BBOWT is doing

BBOWT is passionate about halting the decline of our wildlife-rich grasslands. Through a number of projects and our Living Landscape work, we are focusing our efforts to protect, restore and link these precious ‘patches’ on our nature reserves and through the wider countryside.

Help us protect these once plentiful meadows. Join us today!

Types of grassland

Neutral grassland

Ragged-robin by Andy Fairbairn

Neutral grassland is neither acidic nor alkaline. Some of the most important sites for birds are unimproved wet grasslands which are grazed rather than cut for hay.

What to see

Where to see

Find out more about neutral grassland.

Calcareous grassland

Small copper by Kelly Thomas

Chalk grassland develops on thin layers of soil overlaying chalk. Limestone grassland, although similar to chalk grassland, has subtle differences in vegetation.

What to see

Where to see

Find out more about calcareous grassland.

 

 

Acid grassland

Harebell by Bruce Shortland

Acid grassland is generally found on free-draining soil and can be parched in hotter months. It is the bare, exposed soil in-between the vegetation that also attracts wildlife.

What to see

Where to see

 

Find out more about acid grassland.

Grassland

Grassland by Mark Smith

Find out more about different types of grassland habitats.

Living Landscapes for all

A Living Landscape

Read our recovery plan for nature.

Help the bees

Bee by Gilliane Sills

Bumblebees and honey bees are declining in the UK, endangering the food chains that depend on them. We can all help reverse this trend.

Find out how